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20121204
20121204
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
after secretary of state clinton said the use of chemical weapons by the regime would cross a red line. is the president drawing that line and is he bringing the united states any closer to military action in doing so? >> well, john, i think we ought to be clear. they could have left it today with secretary clinton's statement. i think this was a very deliberate point that the president was making. he is fully engaged in this issue. clearly the president's been briefed, he's talking to his cabinet. we should assume that the united states military has continued the operations on the table fully prepared ready to go. there has been talk about the chemical weapons of syria for months, the military has had time to prepare. the administration has been clear, a military option is not where they want to have to go but i think the president's statement makes the point that they will go there if they have to, and i think that's the right message to send. we cannot permit syria to think using their chemical weapons and serin gas stockpiles is an option for them. >> you make the important point t
.6% rate of the clinton years? he did not. so is there a little give ultimately to sort of say what if it doesn't go up to 39.6%, but say 37%, is that something the white house would accept? also, this that same interview, the president raised the possibility, which is that after you do tax reform and you close loopholes and deductions, that if the rate is raised, the top rate, there's always a possibility that after you do tax reform, of course, the top rate would then go down again. so it was -- you have to listen to the president very carefully to see where there might be some give. the problem from my point of view is that everybody knows what's got to be done in the long-term. it's the question of the short-term deal. >> john boehner, speaker of the house, he came up with a proposal. but not all the conservatives in the house and the senate are on board. jim demint, republican senator from south carolina. >> this is a time to negotiate with ourselves. we need to invite the president to work with us. his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table un
on the president's list of possible replacements for hillary clinton who has said that she is not staying on for the president's second term. cnn's elise labott is at the state department to talk about it. do a comparison for us, off the bat. pros and cons for the top diplomatic post. the halls of the state department are buzzing with potential new secretary of state. both would make a strong candidate. susan rice, for instance, one of president obama's closest advisers. she was his principal foreign policy adviser during his first campaign and helped shape his world view. they have a similar world view. all of this signifies susan rice would be influential when she goes to speak to diplomats around the world and world leaders and also in formulating foreign policy, which is very good for the state department. on the downside, you see what's happening with the benghazi affair. she's likely to have a bruising confirmation process. some republican senators said they might hold up her nomination. that could drag out a while. john kerry, on the other hand, would be easily confirmable. you see
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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